Account of the history of the national grange of the patrons of husbandry

All rights reserved Founding of the National Grange In Oliver Hudson Kelley, a native of Massachusetts, received a commission from President Andrew Johnson to survey agricultural conditions in the Southern states because there was a dearth of reliable information following the War of Oliver Hudson Kelley, principal founder and first Secretary of the National Grange What Kelley saw of conditions in the South and the advantage being taken by Northern carpetbaggers of beleaguered farmers, his work as a Minnesota farmer, his study and writings on agriculture and his association with the Masonic Order combined in the conception of a notion to extend a fraternal hand of friendship to farmers and rural people of the North, South and West to, as he wrote, "restore kindly feelings among the people.

Account of the history of the national grange of the patrons of husbandry

He made an official trip through the South and was astounded by the lack of sound agricultural practices he encountered. Joining with other interested individuals inKelley formed the National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, a fraternal organization complete with its own secret rituals. Local affiliates were known as "granges" and the members as "grangers.

The Grange Movement: Patrons of Husbandry

Growth was slow in the early years, but the attraction of social events was considerable. Farm life in the 19th century was marked by a tedium and isolation that usually was relieved only by church functions and the weekly trips to town for supplies. Following the Panic ofthe Grange spread rapidly throughout the farm belt, since farmers in all areas were plagued by low prices for their products, growing indebtedness and discriminatory treatment by the railroads.

These concerns helped to transform the Grange into a political force. Grange influence was particularly strong in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, where political pressure yielded a series of "Granger laws" designed to give legislative assistance to the farmers.

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Those laws received an initial blessing from the Supreme Court in Munn v. Illinoisbut a later counteroffensive by the railroads brought the Wabash casewhich wiped out those gains. During the s, the Grangers advocated programs such as the following: There were too many farmers and too much productive land; the advent of new, mechanized equipment only exacerbated the difficulties.

A few perceptive individuals recognized that flooding the market with produce only depressed prices further. The Grange as a political force peaked aroundthen gradually declined. The Grange had played an important role by demonstrating that farmers were capable of organizing and advocating a political agenda.

National Grange (washington D.c.) | regardbouddhiste.com

After witnessing the eclipse of its advocacy efforts by other groups, the Grange reverted to its original educational and social events. These have sustained the organization to the present day.

Off-site search results for "The Grange Movement: The Grange As a result of economic downturns, such as the Panic ofthe Grange began to decline in popularity. Many local Grange organizations had purchased too much machinery communally to pay off their bills. ByGrange membership had fallen toWe would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.

The official name of the National Grange is the Patrons of Husbandry the Granger movement was successful in regulating the railroads and grain warehouses Wabash case favorable to state regulation of those phases of interstate commerce upon which Congress itself had not acted.

The National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry (also known as the Grange), organized in , was led by Oliver H. Kelley.

Account of the history of the national grange of the patrons of husbandry

Kelley's first objective was to enhance the lives of isolated farmers through social, educational, and fraternal activities. Feb 01,  · The Grange, officially referred to as The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a fraternal organization in the United States that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture.

The Grange. Joining with other interested individuals in , Kelley formed the National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, a fraternal organization complete with its own secret rituals.

Local affiliates were known as "granges" and the members as "grangers." In its early years, the Grange was devoted to educational events and social gatherings. GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

Account of the history of the national grange of the patrons of husbandry
History of the National Grange, the Order of Patrons of Husbandry